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Seven Elements to Web Design

 

1. Backgrounds & Colors
2. Text Attributes
3. Images & Animations
4. KISS
5. Content
6. Organization/Layout
7. Charting the Flow

 


Colors & Background Images

  • Color can ruin some web sites. You want to be sure to use color but don't over do it.
  • Background images and patterns are nice but often make the text hard to read.

    • Be sure that any background image compliments your text and graphics.

    • Consider the download time.

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Text Attributes

  • Just because you have twenty fonts doesn't mean you have to use all twenty.

  • Format the text so that it can be seen by people without their bifocals.

    • Space your text for readability.

    • Separate parts of your Web page (head, body, tail)

      • Use rule lines or colored/textured line graphics.

  • Resist the urge to overuse any type of emphasis (Boldface, italics, Special Formatting) or else you ultimately lose the effect.

  • Do not discredit your content; Use Spell Check & Proofread.

  • Always have someone else read the pages and check for errors.

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Images

  • Do not overuse graphic elements, images, and animations.

  • Remember the average Internet surfer is using a 14.4 bps modem.

  • Use images only when necessary to support content.

  • If you use pictures, keep images small in size.

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KISS 


KEEP IT SWEET AND SIMPLE

Do not

 overshadow the content

 by the flash of your page.

All emphasis is no emphasis.

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Content

  • What type of information or content do you want to put on the Web? 

  • What are the goals for your presentation?
  • Sharing information about your classroom.

  • Providing access to other resources.

  • Online Activity for your students
  • Brainstorm and list a few of your ideas

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Organization

  • Show users what's on your pages in as concise a manner as possible.

  • Put the important stuff first. Web pages should grab the reader's attention with important content (and a bit of flash on the side).
  • Use bullets or tables for lists whenever you can. If you choose to use lots of links on your Web pages, be sure to organize them by topic or category for easy reference.

  • Organize your content into main topics.
  • Try to keep the topic and content of each page focused, and make each page one complete thought or idea. Pages should be modular and be able to stand alone.

  • How will readers get from one page to another?

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Charting the Flow
Join Structure and Content

  • Create an outline by featuring major headings and sub headings and indicating whether pictures or other resources are present.

  • Create a storyboard - a sketch that shows the layout of your web pages.

  • Share your storyboard with others to solicit input regarding its structure and organization.

  • Use a flowchart or graphical organizer

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Updated: 04/04/00